Which summary of the passage is the best? why do you celebrate? what has caesar done for you and for rome? does he bring riches and servants back with him? you are senseless and heartless people. have you forgotten about how much you loved pompey? marullus regrets that the people are celebrating caesar and is insulted that they forgot how they used to praise pompey. marullus thinks that the people should celebrate caesar the way they used to celebrate pompey, and that they should be in awe of caesar’s greatness. marullus remembers how “many a time and oft have you climbed up to walls and battlements, to towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops, your infants in your arms,” to see pompey when he returns from battle.


Question: Which summary of the passage is the best? why do you celebrate? what has caesar done for you and for rome? does he bring riches and servants back with him? you are senseless and heartless people. have you forgotten about how much you loved pompey? marullus regrets that the people are celebrating caesar and is insulted that they forgot how they used to praise pompey. marullus thinks that the people should celebrate caesar the way they used to celebrate pompey, and that they should be in awe of caesar’s greatness. marullus remembers how “many a time and oft have you climbed up to walls and battlements, to towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops, your infants in your arms,” to see pompey when he returns from battle.

In our analysis of historical sentiments, we delve into the public's fluctuating allegiances and the factors driving such changes. The passage in question presents a compelling scenario: the populace, once ardent supporters of Pompey, now shift their adulation to Caesar. Marullus, a character voicing his dismay, highlights the fickleness of public opinion.


Marullus questions the best summary for this passage, probing into the reasons behind the celebrations for Caesar. He challenges the people's loyalty by asking what tangible benefits Caesar has brought them. Riches? Servants? His rhetoric suggests that their support is unfounded and driven by forgetfulness rather than reason.


The crux of Marullus's argument lies in his accusation of the people being "senseless and heartless," having swiftly forgotten their former hero, Pompey. He laments their short memory and lack of gratitude towards someone they once revered.


Marullus proposes that if celebrations are to occur, they should mirror those held for Pompey, filled with awe for Caesar's greatness. He reminisces about the times when people would go to great lengths, even risking their safety, to catch a glimpse of Pompey returning from battle.


This reflection on past loyalties serves as a reminder of how public sentiment can be transient and influenced by recent events, often overlooking past achievements.

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